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of our schools. they're not military encampments. they're safe environments in which the children feel very secure around with that kind of protection. you think about, in your country, england has an armed presence for international flights going in and out of england in a very sensitive environment called an airplane. post-9/11, people said guns have no place in the cockpit or in the passenger planes. but in fact, they have worked very well because they're trained. >> actually, let me pick you up on that. it has works effectively. what's been effective on planes is an outright ban on any weapons, any guns. that's what's been effective. the reason you dont see people using guns on planes is they have been banned. this brings me to the point of what i have been trying to get to on this show, which is it's not about removing everybody's guns in america. it's a complete fallacy when people spin out that line. it's designed, i think, to instill the kind of fear president obama talked about today. trying to make people think, oh, my god, they're coming for my gun. and what happens is a lot
being eased up, a very good environment for lending, very solid for housing. i can see a lot more reasons to be positive than negative right now. >> if interest rates went up 100 basis points, you think housing would do as well? >> you think they will go up 100 basis points. >> my point is housing better do good at historically manipulated low rates. i don't see that it's bragging rights here. >> right, right. the minute interest rates going up, where is the blockbuster in housing building taking place, in the midwest or takingce in new york city, new york, the tri-metro area, boston, chicago, where is it taking place because housing in and around the new york metro area is not going off to the races? >> well, you're going to see it across the country. that seems to be what the surveys are showing. now, the latest survey of the national association of home builders suggested things were a little bit flat, but you're going to get rebuilding after hurricane sandy in the northeast, and there are bidding wars in places like phoenix and parts of florida that used to be soaking in exces
political environment, what is the number one challenge as he prepares to address the american people tomorrow? >> well, i still think it is about the hope of the american people, and it is still historic, the second inauguration of this president. but at the same time, obviously, it's going to be working with congress to get the economy moving, moving forward in terms of the big initiatives that the president considers to be so important with regard to immigration reform, implementation of health care reform and making sure that everybody has an opportunity, has a shot at the american dream. >> you mentioned health care reform. you know, republicans would say he did that first last time. he got in our face. that ruined the environment. i know each side blames the other side. i don't want to revisit history, but as the president picks his order this time, republicans have, for example, shown a willingness to work on immigration. should he do immigration before gun control, try to cooperate before confrontation? >> well, i think the president is going to move forward and see this as a
been studying how the radiation from fukushima has affected the environment. maybe you can give a summary what you have so far. >> yes, thank you, john. i would like to thank the organizers for being here. first visited fukushima in july of 2011 shortly after the disaster. and we spent about six weeks there since that time monitoring the movement of the contaminants and looking at the effect on the biological community. everything we have learned is new. it there's never been an event quite like this. there was twenty six years and we worked on that but the fukushima event and luckily was smaller, at least on the terrestrial side. we're thankful that are if that. the sorts things we've been looking at how are the insects, birds, microbes effected. are there measurable containment. and, you know, the first sets of results for preliminary published. we had a couple of paper published related to biodiversity as well as the major insect groups. the most striking thing to come from it is the level of variation among different groups. birds and butterflies, for instance, showed very s
environment. the project delivery improvement included in map 21 based on an innovative -- innovation initiative known as everyday counts. they took it from you, victor. you've done a great job with every day that counts. let's hear it for decter menendez and what he has done and what his team has done. thank you, victor. [applause] the concept behind everyday counts is the same as this year's thp. better, faster and smarter. finally map 21 helps us keep our transportation system safe. this law gives the department for the first time oversight over transit safety. again, a big thanks goes to peter rogoff. in the train crash your and 10, peter and i decided that we would commit ourselves to getting the department of transportation into the transit safety business and thanks to all of his decades of experience on capitol hill, he and i worked with congress to have included in map 21 the ability of the fta to have responsibility for transit safety. we were outlawed from doing it, and now we will have the authority to do it. this is a real breakthrough. and it really fits her safety agend
of capacity and given the macro environment, given the cannibalization that tablets are doing with the expensive notebooks and the road map that is questionable. >> is there a road map that you see that gets them into the tablet and mobile space in a better way? you look at what is happening to the stock of arm, look at the stock of qualcomm, and these guys are nowhere in the same arena. >> that's a good question. they have the road map to get in. will they have a position of dominance? being the same is not going to be enough, particularly given a lot of oems over many, many years being accustom to them being basically sole source or a dominant proprietary source when you have an alternative where you have a multi source solution, some suppliers that use their processing from a company called arm. so it's going to be very tough. you have to have significant advances for oems to use your product. i don't think they that. >> what does this say about hue yet pack yard? what does this say about the news about dell with a potential buyout? i assume what is happening at intel is ha
and corporate tax it is time to change so people can keep their own money and foster an environment where businesses want to invest andreate good paying jobs. he would hike the 4 percent sales tax and some say like it up to washington d.c., is that right or wrong? i am dave asbin. we'll go to steve and rich and mike and john, you love this idea and think it is good for the whole, country explain. >> one of the scandal is not the deficits, but the fact that federal government collects 2.5 trillion. with the consumption or sales tax, this is the lone way we can limit how much money gets to the federal government and more businesses would be created and jobs and the federal government would not be penalizing our work and we would get more work and jobs. >> sounds good to me, rick, to you? >> here's the problem. i will not touch incredibly regressive nature of this. >> by regressive, it hits the poor more than the rich? >> exactly. put the brakes on a economy, imagine what happens here. first of all, to keep the revenue neutral, you are looking at a 20r 30 percent sales tax . add that to the
enough that it would allow people to start raising capital in this environment while meanwhile it gives you experience and time to get them right? >> well, i think -- good to see you, professor. i think that question goes specifically to the larger question of the problem with principles-based rules which, obviously, at the sec we're not used to. we're very prescriptive in our rulemaking. but i'll point out to you, though, too when we try if you look at the proposal on general solicitation, when things are a little more principles-based and flexible what we get back from industry, from lawyers, from, you know, trade groups is, please, give us a safe harbor with three easy steps and a checklist so that we can insure ourselves against liability both from the sec and civilly. and so there is oftentimes a press to get that sort of prescriptive rulemaking. so i just, quite frankly, i'm skeptical it would work because i don't know if folks would take the ball and run with it if there was, you know, a principles-based approach here. i think instead the sec, we -- the commission -- need to just
in the ecosystem. >> basically it's come to this. the environment where these pythons now live is not used to them. these creatures have evolved from places like the rainforest in southeast asia or the african savannah, and the habitat or the grassland habitat that you find in the everglades just simply is not equipped to deal with these very new and very invasive species. basically these pythons are invaders, and they are eating everything they come in contact with. >> you say these very new, are these pythons that were people's pets? >> likely that's how all of this originated. pot past 30 years people have been importing these snakes. a lot less lately. but during the 1970s and 1980s thousands and thousands of these snakes were brought in from asia and africa, and more often than not they either escaped because of hurricanes or people released them into environments where they shouldn't have, and these animals took over. they started out as pets, and then through negligence were released and, unfortunately, this ecosystem just really is not prepared to take on what these snakes do to the enviro
make this practical for us and our viewers. how do we make money in this environment? we know where we are, see what the reality is, may not be what you want but the fed is there, providing easy market and that's why this market wants to go nowhere but up except in equities. how do you make money in this market? >> the fed is pushing you into risk assets so that's where you go. you have to keep going while the band is playing, but this is what concerns me is at what point do we get the snap-back? we already started off 2012 with a record amount of money going into high yield. how would you like to buy c-paper and get 5.5% return on it as far as yield goes? >> i would hate to be a portfolio manager in this kind of environment because i don't know how you balance a portfolio in terms of risk. >> i would love to be one, and i think part of it is if you -- you can make money dmest click because stocks are still relatively valued or undervalued based on, you know, the fed's model and other models, a lot of opportunities to pick up stocks that were hit hard during the summer, industrial stoc
, deficits, gun control, immigration. a lot to do and not a great environment to get it done. but with us now, two men who may not have to worry too much about that, but who may give us great insights if possible to get great things done. barney frank, the former democratic congressman from massachusetts and steve latourette, republican from ohio. first to you, congressman, as the democrat, what does the president have to do differently in the second term to have a more cooperative, working environment. to you, sir, what does the republican party need to do to try to get some things done? >> i have to differ with the preface, john. >> i thought you might. >> barack obama -- look, this notion that partisanship has taken over. it began when barack obama became president. i was chairman of the financial service committee of 2007 in the bush administration and i worked very closely with hank paulson, secretary of the treasury. we worked on putting fannie mae and freddie mac to stop the lawsuits. george bush went to harry reid and nancy pelosi in december of 2007. he said the economy is slipping,
-- and i can promise you in this environment, this media environment, particularly one where the mainstream media just ate his story like strawberry ice cream without questioning it. there's a lot of people digging and he's going to have to live with his truth. and i would tell any client in a crisis kind of situation, better you get your truth out in your words with your understandings and move on from there. but this story isn't over yet, chris. there's more questions than answers right now. >> without a doubt. howard bragman always good to have you on the program. thank you. >>> today's tweet of the day. it's been retweeted more than 4,000 times already. after years of lying to my face, lance armstrong apologizes in an e-mail. he can keep it. nners a great idea, and they won't be beginners for long. they'll go to where they can get the skills, the savings, and the supplies they need - to go from beginning... to doing... to beautifully done. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. right now this ashland vanity is a special buy at just two hundred, ninety-nine dollars.
the environment. so, the green button here we are in san francisco, i can say with some public comfort that pg&e is a signatory to the green button, download my data. and basically you go to the utility website. you can download your own green button data which by itself is, well, i'm an energy guy, an energy geek. i consider with confidence. it is not interesting, necessarily, but when you take your green button data and you give it to some companies, they have amazing things they can do with that green button to, again, save you money. something as simple as if you look at your green button which is kilowatt hours for those that are engineering minded, a line grab if you think about t some companies today can look at your green button and figure out if your refrigerator is broken function need a new air conditioner. that's real money if you think about it at a commercial or industrial scale. that is one data set. to your other question about what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the
environment. >> they are more parsimonious today but he also said tell the truth because sooner or later people will find out. that is still a modern day public relations. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn0-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. mortgage. married. two great kids. he wants to protect his family with a $500,000 term life insurance policy. what do you think it'll cost him? a hundred dollars a month? sixty? forty? actually none of the above. john can get a $500,000 policy -from a highly rated insurer - for under $25 a month. his secret? selectquote. selectquote is impartial. they'll search the pick of insurers like these to give you a choice of your best prices. selectquote has great savings on term life for women, too. john's wife carrie, can get a $500,000 policy for under $16 a month. selectquote has helped make term life insurance affordable for hundreds of thousands of peo
. it increases the level of stabilitcivility in politics. we will change the environment in which politics is being conducted. we will elect many more women to public office. that is a very good thing for our country. >> out as a young mother. i got a solicitation letter from a group of women who said they were getting organized to get more women elected for public office. i thought that is a powerful idea. about 25 years later. people are taught about how i should grow wings and fly. she said he should do this. i can show you how and i can promise if you do emily's list will be with you every step of the way. i and the senator from the commonwealth of massachusetts. >> i am cleric paschal -- claire mccaskill. the energy in this room is amazing. i am taking it with me. i will draw upon it many times over the next six years when there are tough votes ahead. many people heard of todd a a senator or as statewide official. i was the doctor of the first woman elected to the council in the town -- daughter of the first woman ever elected to the council the town ichor up in. i knew what it took.
-- we have people thae and file once a week. if you want to come you like being in the environment we would love to have you. >> thank you for joining us, too. good look to the havens tomorrow. yu >> there's a flock of ravens he'ded to new england right now. a live report is straight ahead from fox pur row. flush >> welcome back. thanks for joining us. let's take another look outside with john. >> take a look at this little graphic i have got. this shows the pressure patterns over the northern members fear. you can see this big blob of blue. it translates to temperatures. the coldest of the temperatures are not concentrated over eastern north america especially over eastern canada but it is dipping down. this is the forecast over the next week and a half or so. it keeps dipping down into the mid atlantic region. a much colder forecast ore the next week or so is in store. details coming up in just a minute. >> thank you. it's the ravens and patriots all over again. this time baltimore is looking for redemption. >> the road to new orleans makes a stop at fox borough massachusetts this m
of the economic environment we've experienced in the last couple of years, exceptional product and a great customer experience, there's opportunity for share gain. we believe if we can see it on our terms in thaur environment, we're still going to win. >> it starts and ends with product. >> mickey really stirred the pot during the korns when he said it's unbelievable that amazon hasn't been mentioned. >> that's good. yeah. i guess jeff basel doesn't show up for these things, but he is one of the big elephants on the block, too. >> most definitely. and we know they're willing to take a loss sometimes just to gain that market share and it does seem to be worrying folks so much so that they're afraid to talk about it. >> were the abercrombie guys there? >> no. >> i want to get that guy there. >> you want to get him on the plane. you have to follow the rules, have to have the right uniform. >> what's the song they sing? >> phil collins. but a lot of other rules, too. >> you're not allowed to wear flip-flops. >> and they can only address them -- >> wear the same cologne, too. >> there has to be
. it was a big grab bag, $787 billion of goodies that included many things for energy and the environment. i don't recall offhand the overall ratings for energy but i know a lot were included in the economic stimulus bill. host: is president obama making fewer promises that he was initially? guest: absolutely, the 2012 campaign was a campaign of attacks. when we look back at the moments of the campaign, as you look at the debates, what they were sitting on the campaign trail, what they were saying in commercials -- they spent some months of the time attacking each other and relatively little really laying out their agenda in any detail. particularly, mitt romney did not provide any details about his tax plan but even obama spent some much time attacking the romney that there were fewer promises made. there was less of an agenda. host: one last look at theobameter - he has made progress on 73% of his promises. thank you for being here this morning. coming up next is our regular america by the numbers segment where we will look at how american students are performing in schools and how they rank c
environment go away. mike mipg travis, what happens in your business in this coming year? >> we had two huge rollouts the left model for chord buddy 20% of people are left handed the classical model for chord buddy will not happen. we will not get the breaks that we needed to write off that money, you know, tax wise. >> let it's not there anymore new product somebody has got it to build if it and ship it and sell it it's several jobs down the line that went happen because you don't have the money to make that work. >> right. >> all right. and, john, you talked about there may be fewer folks out on the road with you. >> yeah. that means what happens to those people? where do they go? what can they do? >> it's that effect of people losing jobs. and, you know, it's -- i mean, it's a painful thing to let somebody go that you have been working with for years and years. especially in music and what i do. that's part of what you do. it's part of your sound. at the end of the day you are looking at your paper and looking at your numbers. and i'm not going to run a business in the red. i'm not going
's not what they get. they get dance in a totally different environment. >> reporter: the group began in a totally different environment 22 years ago with founder emilia rudolph. where did the idea come from? what was the genesis of this? >> one day clinging to a cliff in the sierra looking out at the vast view, i asked this question -- what would it be like to dance here? what would that mean? >>. >> reporter: it meant combining amelia's love of dance -- >> you open it as awe step back. >> reporter: with her then-boyfriend peter mayfield's passion for rock climbing. >> we eastern were connecting around how rock climbing and dance were very similar. >> double double, double two loops. >> reporter: for 22 years now, they have used the tools of rock climbing to scale their stages. in mexico that stage was the site of the oldest cathedral in the country. >> and stop. perfect. >> reporter: executive director thomas cavanaugh oversees the performance. safety always comes first. >> locked, two bolts -- >> reporter: after months of advance work and a week of intend rehears
the weaponry of law enforcement. it seems like it's one that should be in military type of environment, and it's unheard of and it's frightening. >> john: well, you saw the poll results. you obviously speak with the majority of americans who feel that civilians should not be allowed to own weapons that are built to kill a large amount of people at a time. >> absolutely. >> john: we have a chance to see real change? >> i must be optimistic. however, it still is a slow-moving process. i knew that the situation that happened in connecticut was definitely the straw that broke the camel's back. i'm just not that excited on how slow they're moving on this. and i really would like to get this out to the president that he needs to move full speed ahead with this. >> john: while the majority of nra members do support many same gun support measures, there is bush pack.push back. what do you hear the most. >> it is not guns that kill people. it's people that kill people. but we need to remember in a still in all four an individual, a criminal to kill someone with gun violence, it's a gun. it's what they
is going to be about to a large degree. he did something that was risky and the environment where you can ask anything, that's why it's called imam. and successful to get tens of thousands of people to register, and then on the election day ten thousands more. this went totally below the radar, and it was a huge success. >> john: and 9,000 of those on reddit asked him about legalizing weed. what was frustrating for you covering this campaign. >> thank god for denver because it would have been the most boring campaign in history. the most frustrating part is hundreds of journalists covering the same thing and writing the same thing and trying desperately coming up with something new while dealing with the obama re-election campaign. these guys know how to play pretty rough. they'll lie to your faces as good as anybody. how do you navigate that and get around it and not get sucked in so all you're doing pro whatever candidate propaganda you're covering. >> john: we could talk about this all night looking forward to the end of the last week of his first term, what do you see as the future of
environment go away. >> mike: all right. travis, what happens to your business in this coming year? >> we had two huge rollouts and the left-handed model for chord buddy, 20% of people are left-handed and the classical model it's not going to happen. we will not get the breaks that are need today write off that money tax-wise, it's not there anymore. >> mike: new product means you've got to manufacture more, means somebody's got to build it, somebody's got to ship it, somebody's got to sell it, so it's several jobs down the line, that won't happen because you don't have the money to make that work. >> right. >> and john, you talked about may be fewer folks out on the road with you. >> yeah. >> mike: what happens to those people, where do they go? what can they do? >> it's that effect of people losing jobs. and i mean, it's a painful thing to let somebody go that you've been working with for years and years and especially in music and what i do. that's part of what you do and part of your sound, but at the end of the day looking at your papers and your numbers and i'm not going to run a busine
people working with the pimp will work to bring this person back if they can. they create an environment in which this person is very fearful and may return again to it. so what we know is that the internet has changed how this works. it's no longer somebody walking a street. it's advertised online. and backpage.com is one of the chief places where it happens. over the last couple of years, our police department has recovered over 25 young women that were advertised for sale b on backpage.com. and when you go, you have a chance and you go online, look up your city on backpage.com, and you will find b that escorts are being advertised in your city. now, you don't know whether those are over 18 or under 18, but i can tell you neither does back page. they will say they will work on it, but we asked them, and the u.s. conference of mayors asked them to require them to have in-person age verification with id for everyone they advertise as an escort, and they refused. now, we brought pressure on them, attorney generals across the country did, state leaders did, and backpage.com was a wholly ow
business and bald in their interest and they share the responsibility for how to invest in environments and how to report those local governments that actually take large responsibility for mitigating risk with their is this an investment. >> thank you. we have time just for one more question. i've got about three hours of questions and frenemy. this next one combined three or four cards, a question that came from the audience and it comes under the title of damned if you do and damned if you don't. this is about rebuilding and reallocating. what happens to poor people who can't afford to keep their homes and craig you dealt with this and margareta also. also some of the vulnerable areas are also economic centered where factories and infrastructure and corporations in areas and that is part of what drives people to be there. there is also an industrial economic aspect to this. part of the challenge about helping are not helping is an ethical question as well as a legal question. i would like each of you to address that briefly if you could. >> here is how i have been framing it. i have
typical of the urban environment that you're going to go into -- let's go back to aurora. those covering communities around aurora, colorado that it is an important conversation because they're sore consensus around the country above refer to its gun legislation that complements other things. it was defined in republican areas a lot of support for afterschool. the further away you get in continuing the conversation i would say you dispel a breakdown of cultural barriers because there are differences, your ranch in montana. >> on came to my ranch to go fishing and i said to my ranch manager, who is an avid outdoorsman and quite apolitical, owns a lot of guns, but primarily a traditional bow hunter. i say trade when it's coming at us to the has chief of staff ms. brittany secret service detail within. said i've got to go make a spirit i said no, they are going to let their guns. the secret service came and spent a lot of time and came back on other occasions to go fishiness in the secret service had my ranch manager bonded over it. >> respect do not and i don't want to use your ranch incom
and disgusting to me that we allow a work environment in the military, specifically in this case in the air force, that is so hostile to women. and i believe heads should roll. >> reporter: an air force spokesman confirmed that investigations have been launched into those responsible for the pornography and that some personnel may be subject to possible court-martials. this kind of material, the spokesman said, is not acceptable in this day and age. for "today," nbc news, washington. >>> there's a lot more to come on "today," including an inside look at the church of scientology. why is tom cruise such an important member? we'll ask the author of a book that examine the ties between scientology and celebrities. >>> first, this is "today" on nbc. >>> still to come, answers to your pressing real estate questions including whether now is the best time to buy even if you're struggling to come up with a down payment. >>> plus, how has four years in the white house aged president obama? >> good morning everyone. i am deborah weiner. here's a look at the morning's top stories. we are more than 24-hours
environment, both parties are a little more subdued. republicans are panicky after two bad elections in a roam democrats don't have quite the same enthusiasm. but they're happy to be in their position. much better shape than republicans. >> heather: scott, you mentioned your marriage. four years in, you're still kind of a newly wed. you're still supposed to be excited about what is to come. how do the american people about this? we're headed into the second term for the president. are people optimistic? >> well, they're a little more optimistic than theygo. when the president first took office, 27% said the country was heading in the right direction. now it's up to 36%. on the day he was sworn in, four years ago, 35% said their finances were in good shape. it's up to 39% today. so progress, but people aren't really excited yet. there is still a lot of concerns to be dealt with. >> gregg: let's talk about the second amendment. you conducted a poll on that. what did you find? >> 65% of american voters, out of american adults, two out of three, say the reason we have a second amendment is so the
a catastrophic event and when these things happen, you need to look at policy and adapt to the environment. the important thing is to find a couple of items and be for it rather than saying we are against everything. backing the nra position which is more guns in schools. that is not a republican position. that would cost $5 billion to do. >> par do get republican support here on back ground checks. 87% of democrats and a lot of republicans support that. a lot on news controls and 38% democrats. you go beyond that and almost every other issue and the assault weapons ban. the semi automatic weapons and sales on the clips. a minority of republicans support all those issues. >> the items listed on that list and things that the republicans are talking about. they have nothing to do with the second amendment and my point is don't wait for the democrats to come out and respond to it. they have a republican plan and we both live on planet earth here. >> politically speaking, what would happen. >> the republican from texas stands up and said okay, let's support these gun control issues. >> i think
to keep control. he had to control the environment. he had to control the situation. and that, again, is so similar to madoff. >> sports is filled with cheating and everybody knows it, but there is an aspect of this story that oprah asked lance armstrong which is about in order to cover up, he told a lot of lies. that included emma o'reilly, armstrong's former masseuse. she said lance, quote, tried to make her life a living hell after she went public with some of the details of his doping operation. >> what do you want to say about emma o'reilly? >> hey, she -- she's one of these people that i have to apologize to. >> mm-hmm. >> she's one of these people that got run over, got bullied. >> yeah. isn't she -- you sued her. >> to be honest, oprah, we sued so many people, i'm sure we did. >> you're suing people and you know that they're telling the truth. what is that? >> it's -- it's a major flaw, and it's a guy who expected to get whatever he wanted and to control every outcome. it's inexcusable. and that's -- when i say that there are people that will hear this and will never forgive
her. my husband had to be a closeted liberal in 2007 in his professional environment. we're both eagerly awaiting our evening with the most awesome liberals everybody. you are our happy pill every day. i'm a happy pill. >> awe. >> stephanie: with admiration for all of you. [ applause ] >> stephanie: and with her colonel husband, and with the entire cast of sexy liberal characters rocky mountain mike sue in rockville, danielle -- >> possy up. >> stephanie: right. john fugelsang we're going to take our victory lap, right? >> yes, we are. i think so. it's a great time to retire all of those mitt romney jokes i can never tell again. washed away the same weekend as the hurricane, two years of work destroyed by you liberals. we could have an comedy orgasm with mitt romney. instead we're stuck with this competent democrat. >> stephanie: john fugelsang are you a good packer? because this is a combination sexy liberal -- i don't even know -- >> i know. >> stephanie: we are doing the radio show from there monday and tuesday. >> from where? >> stephanie: bill press's studio
and that environment started to infect him almost like a virus. >> whatever it was that got into john mcafee, it was powerful. powerful enough that by july 2010 the antidrug crusader had acquired a pro-drug alias. writing as stuffmonger to an online drug discussion forum called bluelight mcafee boasted of purifying mdpv known as bath salts. it had increased alertness and turbo-charged sex drives, but along with that, experts say comes psychosis and paranoia. >> this is something that everybody knows is a nasty drug and yet john starts posting saying that he thinks it's the most extraordinary thing ever primarily because of the hypersexuality that it creates and in these posts he says that he's produced over 50 pounds of the substance and that he's distributed more than 3,000 doses of it throughout the country that he's in which is belize. >> when asked about that, though, mcafee told davis those postings were just a joke, part of a harmless prank. >> first of all, i wouldn't know how to produce 50 pounds of mdpv. i'm not a chemist. >> how had one of the silicon valley success stories got
a category you're interested in, everything from education to health. even the environment. and it will use geolocation to connect you with places to volunteer. and, of course, for those of you who are just counting down the minutes, there's an app for that too, of course. it's called the inauguration countdown. it's available on ios devices. the app will break down the days, hours, minutes, and yes, even seconds until the is ceremony. so on monday as president obama takes the oath, your front row seat at the digital ceremony may just be your smartphone. >> and laurie segal joins us right now. and laurie, since this is washington, no surprise, there is already a controversy over the inauguration app. tell us about this. >> you're absolutely right. people are worried they're putting their cell phone numbers in here and a report came out that said maybe this data could be used, and handed to third parties and you could end up on an e-mail list. i asked the question, they gave me a statement. let me read it quick. they say contrary to some concerns, the app only collects one sort of user data.
since the 2010 elections when the democrats took a beating has crated the current environment. the president is strong. going forward in the second term, does he try and reduce the deficit? does he try and fix long term problems with social security and medicare or does it make it about scoring political points on things like taxes on the super rich or gun control issues that don't matter to your average american. if you listen to his rhetoric, i'm not optimistic about the second term. >> is he on a roll or is he stalled as he begins the second term? >> well, i would disagree strongly with chris and say these are scoring political points and not things that resonate with the average american. if they did not resonate, he would not have won a second term. all these issues including raising taxes on the rich are supported by strong majorities of americans. one issue that he'll taken on not on the radar screen three months ago or certainly a year ago is obviously the issue of reducing gun violence. this is supported by vast majorities of americans, simple common sense laws like r
the japanese planes will be flying again. it is an extremely confusing environment if you have one set of airlines saying they are grounding and another set of airlines saying they are still flying them. >> how disruptive is this for travelers? >> by and large, almost nonexistent. the airlines will swap in some -- jal and ana have canceled some flights, swapped in other aircraft, absolutely minimal. not at the moment an issue of disruption. >> richard quest, thank you. >>> so three months all alone at sea. coming up, we catch up with one of the most determined competitors we have ever met racing around the world all by himself. in a sailboat. ♪ using cloud computing and mobile technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. ya. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it
. frankly we need legislation that makes it a crime. unsafe environment, those kind of things, but is that really getting at the particular issue? i don't think it does. and sometimes they have to be able to be creative to do that. in a regard to domestic violence. absolutely. here's what we could do with that. first of all, and forgive me for saying the obvious, but nix is a wonderful thing. i'm sorry, ncic. they're both wonderful things. but ncic is a wonderful thing but anything with a serial number goes in there, too like a toaster, if you have one. it's not necessarily a go-to database. i think you're right on and i think that those people should go into the nix system right away and i think that what we need is then funding for crisis teams. because a lot of times, and even when guns and often is the case are not involved but someone needs some help and an officer rolls up at 3:00 in the morning and they are very limited in the resources that are available to them. if there is funding for properly trained crisis intervention people, there we go. now we got something. no
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